Where Is Central African Republic Located?

Where is Central African Republic located? Here is the answer and more…

The Central African Republic is a developing Central African country with an estimated population of 4,500,000, covering an area of ​​approximately 623,000 km2. It is surrounded by Cameroon to the west, Chad to the north, Sudan and South Sudan to the east, the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Republic of Congo to the south. The country is a member of the African Union, the Economic and Monetary Community of Central Africa and the Community of Sahelo-Saharan States.

The country is divided between savannas and equatorial forest (in the south), and essentially has a tropical climate. The Central African Republic also has many natural resources, including uranium, gold, diamonds and oil.

The territory of the Central African Republic corresponds to that of the French colony of Oubangui-Chari, which is part of the French Equatorial Africa from 1910 to 1960. After independence, the country was led by various authoritarian regimes, notably that of Jean-Bedel Bokassa, president, then self-proclaimed emperor. The former colonial power continues to play an important role. The first free elections with multiparty politics took place in 1993. They brought to power Ange-Félix Patassé, overthrown in 2003 by François Bozizé. The latter, re-elected in 2005 and 2010, was in turn overthrown in 2013 by the Seleka, a militia alliance led by Michel Am-Nondokro Djotodia, during the second civil war of Central Africa. In 2016, Faustin-Archange Touadéra is elected President of the Republic.

Where is Central African Repuclic located? The Central African Republic is in Central Africa, north of the Democratic Republic of Congo. The country does not have access to the sea, like most countries in Central Africa.

The Central African Republic has a greater surface area (about 12%) than the European territory of metropolitan France and almost twice the size of Côte d’Ivoire.

The industrial fabric, which has never been highly developed compared to neighboring countries such as Cameroon, has suffered successive military and political unrest, and is now virtually non-existent. Some industries developed in the 1970s (fabric factories, shoes …) have disappeared. There is still local production of beer and aluminum processing. The private sector employs about 11,000 people.

Public utilities (water, electricity, telephone wire …), state monopolies, are in difficult financial situations, and equipment, lack of maintenance and investment, are for the most part dilapidated, leading to breaks in service very frequent. The heavy burden of debt in the national budget, and the low level of own resources, make State management difficult (non-payment of civil servants’ salaries, strikes and social movements) and contribute to the fragility of political institutions .

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